How do I know if I have an earwax problem?


How can I flush my ears at home?

Some say to remove any visible discharge or earwax using cotton wool. Hold the bottle in your hand to warm it – cold ear drops can make you feel dizzy. Lie on your side with the affected ear facing up to put the drops in. Gently pull and push your ear to work the drops in. Stay lying down for 5 minutes so the drops don’t come out.

Other, smarter people, say that you should not endanger your hearing by using home remedies. Get seen by trained professionals at your nearest Audiology Clinic, making sure they use the latest microsuction earwax removal system. Totally painless, totally safe.

How does the doctor clean out your ears?

If wax buildup is the issue, your doctor will perform the irrigation in their office using a syringe-like tool. This tool will be used to insert water or a water and saline mixture into the ear to flush out the wax. You may feel slight discomfort from the water in your ear or from holding your ear in place. At least the old-school does.

These days the safest and totally painless way to do it is to get microsuction earwax removal treatment at your local Audiology Clinic. No discomfort, no messy fluids swishing around in your ear canal. Just peace of mind that you have just had the best treatment for earwax removal.

Can hydrogen peroxide hurt your ears?

Hydrogen peroxide, although a common household substance, is highly oxidizing in nature. People may insert it into their ears to soften earwax so that it can drain out. However, excessive use of hydrogen peroxide can lead to irritation of the skin inside the ear, which may cause inflammation and earaches. Rather than take this risk, you should be seen for microsuction earwax removal treatment at your local Audiology Clinic.

How do you remove stubborn ear wax at home?

If your eardrum doesn’t contain a tube or have a hole in it, these self-care measures may help you remove excess earwax that’s blocking your ear canal: Soften the wax. Use an eyedropper to apply a few drops of baby oil, mineral oil, glycerin or hydrogen peroxide in your ear canal. Use warm water.

Preferably you’ll go to your local Audiology Clinic specializing in microsuction earwax removal.

Why is my earwax hard?

Dead skin and other debris combine with secretions from sebaceous and modified sweat glands to create earwax. Earwax that picks up a lot of debris or sits in the ear canal for a long time can get hard and dry, so it’s more likely to cause a blockage. Instead you need to be treated by trained professionals at your nearest Audiology Clinic that uses only microsuction earwax removal. It’s the only safe way to know you’ve done it right.

Where can I get microsuction earwax removal near me?

You can find your nearest clinic here.